Tag Archives: Personal Development

Job Layoffs and their Hidden Benefits

Being in between jobs doesn’t have to be experienced like the kiss of death. I know that it is natural to feel very vulnerable, yet that is what being in transition is all about. It’s the very point that you are temporarily unattached to a job that provides you with a rare freedom to ask yourself what you really want from your next adventure.

Key questions to ask yourself in between jobs:

1. How soon do I really have to land a job?

Can you afford some time to step back and evaluate what you really want from your career while you have the freedom and time to prepare yourself for it? Sure, it’s no fun watching your life savings take a downward climb, but is your time here really about the money?

Are you at a point in your life where you can afford to spend some time being selective about your next step or preparing yourself for a new path? Think of your career choices now as investments in your quality of life.

2: Would the jobs you are now searching for be top choices if you were just starting out?

You spend a majority of your waking hours at your job. Consider it like you would a romantic relationship. Are you willing to settle for second best just to be committed?

3: Is it possible to support yourself financially doing what you love?

Make a list of all the different ways you can generate income by doing what you love. Your financial support does not have to come from one income stream. Maybe one single role can’t generate enough money, but adding other roles that express your passions might make the necessary difference.

4. Are credentials getting in your way of going for jobs you really want?

Ask yourself if you are truly lacking what is necessary, or if credentials are a convenient excuse to protect you from risk or rejection. Research the kinds of credentials that others doing similar work have. If you don’t have what it takes, identify sources that can provide the appropriate credentials. Don’t make assumptions without checking the facts about the true requirements to do the work.

www.innerarchitect.com

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“Brick Walls” Are For Building-Not Obstacles To Impede You From Your Transition

What Is An Obstacle?

The underpinnings and support you build for yourself when you begin to implement change in your life are first challenged and often thwarted by what we perceive as obstacles that get in the way of our transition. If you can become aware of these obstacles, you give yourself the permission to change the meaning of the very obstacle(s) that stand in your way. Begin by redefining the word “obstacle”:

“The brick walls are there for a reason. The brick walls are not there to keep us out; the brick walls are there to give us a chance to show how badly we want something. . . the brick walls are there to stop the people who don’t want it badly enough. . . they’re there to stop the ‘other’ people.”

Randy Pausch Carnegie Mellon Professor author of “The Last Lecture”

3 Common Types Of Obstacles

In Susan Hanshaw’s “Inner Architect: How To Build The Life You Were Designed To Live” Phase 3 “Breaking Through Fear” contains a very important tool when considering your obstacles: Step 8 “Define What Lies Between You And Change.” Common types of obstacles to change:

1. Fears: Your thoughts about your ability to successfully create change

2. Limited Beliefs: What you think you are capable of acheiveing or becoming

3. Lack of Commitment: Not being completely dedicated to the work involved with the necessary steps

Ultimate Responsibility

Accountability for your actions and efforts is the ultimate responsibility we all have to ourselves.

“We can commit to becoming accountable and responsible to our jobs-careers, to our familiy and friends, yet we often don’t make that same commitment to ourselves.”

Susan Hanshaw Founder Inner Architect and author Inner Architect: How To Build The Life You Were Designed To Live

Transition, Belief, A New Life: Susan Hanshaw’s “Secret To Sucess” Workshop A Difference Maker To Attendees

As the Business Director for Inner Architect, Inner Architect Media, and author Susan Hanshaw it is my role to help raise awareness of Susan’s new book “Inner Architect: How To Build The Life You Were Designed To Live”, her personal development firm Inner Architect, and her upcoming events.

In support of her book and our community, Susan is performing pro-bono workshops for non profit groups, charities, and many employment organizations.

One of the most fulfilling experiences for Susan happened when she presented her workshop “The Secret To Success” June 20 for a group of 60 women at Job Train a Menlo Park based organization. From comments of support to kind words of thanks, many hearts were touched that morning.

One attendee’s comments stood out for me. She wanted us to know that we made her aware of her own choices, her own power, and her own responsibility to herself- “Susan made a big difference for me.  .  .  I didn’t get how much control I really have”

In her own words. . .

photo of susan hanshaw

I had one of my most fulfilling experiences on Friday June 20 when I was invited to speak at a nonprofit organization whose mission is to help those who are most in need to succeed. Sixty women who are enrolled in various vocational job training programs attended my workshop, “The Secret to Success”. Why was it so fulfilling? Because for at least our 90 minutes together, my ideas made a difference.

The breakthrough lesson was how our beliefs are all that holds us back from taking the steps to succeed. We did an exercise that first asked them to write answers to the following:

  • What fears do you have about your job future?
  • What ideas are limiting what you think you can achieve or become in your life?
  • What is holding you back from believing you can stay dedicated to doing the necessary work?

In the second part of the exercise, I asked them to go back and write down what new ideas they could replace the ones above with that would support them in taking action. After a few minutes, several shared how writing their thoughts down enabled them to get clarity they’d never had before.

We can help ourselves break through all our obstacles if only we look closely enough to see what they are.

Try the exercise yourself and see what you might learn.

www.innerarchitect.com

Instincts Exercise: Taking Advantage Of Your Inner Assets

  • A Sense of knowing something without knowing how you know it
  • Insights about your life that are “just there”
  • Persistent ideas that you don’t consciously focus on
  • Desires that you have that you didn’t consciously create
  • Dreams for your life that you would not dare to conjure up on your own
  • Insight that feels like it is coming from the depths of your being
  • A message or piece of knowledge that seems to come from out of nowhere
  • Out of the ordinary bodily sensations

The 8 Common Characteristics of Intuition (above) provide the basis for Susan’s “Instincts Exercise” from her upcoming book “Inner Architect: How To Build The Life You Were Designed To Live.”

Exercise: Review the list of intuition characteristics above. Identify specific insights about what you are meant to be or achieve that have come to you in these ways. This is rich information for you to be in touch with.

*Write as many insights as you can here
*Don’t edit the list in any way
*Just acknowledge what has come to you

Trusting Your Heart: The Key To Unlocking Purpose

Purpose, your passionate interest(s) that brings joy to you and people around you, is the path to fulfilling your life’s meaning and ultimate value. Unfortunately in most cases, you utilize your analytical mind to make decisions rather than “giving credibility to your feelings and accepting their messages as valid.”

Why is it that most of us think of our hearts as an irresponsible force that is only looking for fun when it is the greatest tool to unlocking purpose?

4 Steps to Trusting Your Heart

1. Acknowledge: that your feelings contain messages. Being unhappy is an idea that begs for change. Your inner feelings, subconscious stream of thought, are always expressing how you really feel about something. Often times these feelings are expressing ideas that you may not yet be willing to accept

2. Credibility: give credibility to your feelings and accept their messages as valid Do you discount your feelings and try to rationalize “why” you feel a certain way?

A good example is boredom. Boredom is a syndrome in someone who is not passionate about their work. Rather than understanding this as a valid sign, people discount this sign and suggest that they may cure this syndrome by finding a new work environment. The same job in a different place is only a short term fix at best. Changing workplace locations or environments is not going to cure the fact that you are bored with the work itself; instead this thinking serves to prolong the syndrome rather than cure it

3. Believe: believe that your heart will lead you to a better way of life than your analytical mind. Recognizing and giving credibility to messages from your heart is a key step to happiness in all areas of your life

4. Act: act upon the messages! If you act upon what you trust then it’s important to make the shift to trusting the messages that come from your heart just like you trust your analytical mind

The Purpose Exercise: Are You Willing To Believe In Purpose?

There are keys to evaluate when you are considering implementing any new concept in your life or extracting an old behavior. Consequently you have a choice to make when considering the idea of purpose:

1. You choose to perceive life as a series of meaningless random events

2. You choose to perceive life as having significant purposeful, meaningful events

Key To Evaluate

Are you willing to believe that there is purpose behind everything in life?
Are you willing to begin to approach life from this perspective and respond accordingly?

Purpose Exercise #1

Take out a journal and answer the following questions in as much detail as possible. Mine your memory for the most accurate examples and as many examples as you can remember from your life.

A.) Look at “how” purpose has played a role in your life. Consider all of the experiences and education you have had so far that make up who you are today. Think about the child that you were, and compare it to the adult you are now.

What things about your life have prepared you for who you are now, or who you ultimately wish to be?

B.) Look at your adult life. Consider the jobs that have molded your skill sets and the people who have come into your life.

Can you identify skills and knowledge that will be especially valuable in the work that you would really like to do?

3 Steps To Considering Purpose A Part Of Life

If you recognize that purpose is a part of life that requires that you believe that there is more going on than what you can see on the surface, then what steps do you take to begin to discover your purpose in life? The following steps give you a sound basis to begin your search.

3 Steps To Consider Purpose As A Part Of Life

1. Energy: Think of purpose as an energy that runs through everything in life–including you. Consider the concept of “gravity.” You can’t see it, yet it exists in all geographic areas at all times

2. Random: Remove the idea that your life is a random series of events. Things are connected

3. Reason: Accept the idea that there is a purposeful reason behind everything in life.